Unseen photos of Titanic, a century later after the catastrophe

Stunning images of the Titanic wreckage are released nearly 100 years to the date since the ship slipped beneath the surface of the Atlantic Ocean, in the April edition of National Geographic magazine.

The ghostly bow of the Titanic emerges from the darkness

Photograph by Walden Media
More than two miles down, the ghostly bow of the Titanic emerges from the darkness on a dive by explorer and filmmaker James Cameron in 2001. The ship might have survived a head-on collision with an iceberg, but a sideswipe across her starboard side pierced too many of her watertight compartments.

New modern technologies have made possible the disclosure of  never-seen-before photos of the  of the famous wreck, which has taken with it 1,500 souls.

Intimate, the ruins are a puzzlement of corroded steel hidden in the darkness of the Arctic Ocean. Covered in fungi and weird colourless life forms, the ghostly wreck has been discovered by robotic vehicles used by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution during August and September 2010.

The first complete views of the legendary wreck

Photograph © 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc. Produced by AIVL, WHOI
The first complete views of the legendary wreck
Ethereal views of Titanic’s bow offer a comprehensiveness of detail never seen before. The optical mosaics each consist of 1,500 high-resolution images rectified using sonar data.

They snapped hundreds of images per second, collecting what researchers called “ribbons” of data, which where then “digitally stitched together to assemble a massive high-definition picture,” according to National Geographic.

The propellers of the Olympic

Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland, Collection Harland and Wolff, Ulster Folk & Transport Museum
The propellers of the Olympic—the nearly identical sister ship of the Titanic—dwarf workers at the Belfast shipyard where both ocean liners were built. Few photographs exist of the Titanic, but the Olympic gives a sense of its grand design.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) archaeologist James Delgado told National Geographic that the  expedition, which cost several million dollars, is “a game-changer.”

This optical mosaic combines 300 high-resolution images taken on a 2010 expedition.

Photomosaics © 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc, a subsidiary of Premier Exhibitions, Inc. Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)
With her rudder cleaving the sand and two propeller blades peeking from the murk, Titanic’s mangled stern rests on the abyssal plain, 1,970 feet south of the more photographed bow. This optical mosaic combines 300 high-resolution images taken on a 2010 expedition.

He added: “In the past, trying to understand Titanic was like trying to understand Manhattan at midnight in a rainstorm—with a flashlight.

“Now we have a site that can be understood and measured, with definite things to tell us. In years to come this historic map may give voice to those people who were silenced, seemingly forever, when the cold water closed over them.”

Two of Titanic’s engines

Photograph © 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc. Produced by AIVL, WHOI
Two of Titanic’s engines lie exposed in a gaping cross section of the stern. Draped in “rusticles”—orange stalactites created by iron-eating bacteria—these massive structures, four stories tall, once powered the largest moving man-made object on Earth.

Fascination along side the pain for lost destinies make this metal graveyard an endless story, the mother of  all shipwrecks that will never be forgotten.

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8 thoughts on “Unseen photos of Titanic, a century later after the catastrophe

  1. Pingback: The Titanic As You’ve Never Seen It Before: A Century After It Sank, Stunning New Hi-Tech Images Reveal Doomed Ship On Ocean Floor | | Shift FrequencyShift Frequency

  2. Anyone notice the ghostly figure in the 3rd photo…standing in the pit on the left side??? You can see the rivets on the wall behind him…maybe a double negative, but I don’t know how that stuff works…still haunting.

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